Sunday, April 2, 2017

36 CFR 7.29 - Gateway National Recreation Area Lewdness

36 CFR 7.29 - Gateway National Recreation Area Lewdness
(c)Public lewdness. Section 245.00 of the New York Penal Code is hereby adopted and incorporated into the regulations of this part. Section 245.00 provides that:
A person is guilty of public lewdness when he intentionally exposes the private and intimate parts of his body in a lewd manner or commits any other lewd act (a) in a public place, or (b) in private premises under circumstances in which he may readily be observed from either a public place or from other private premises, and with intent that he be so observed.
[ 41 FR 19220, May 11, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 44157, July 27, 1979; 52 FR 10686, Apr. 2, 1987]

I     “Section 245.00 provides that: A person is guilty of public lewdness when he intentionally exposes the private and intimate parts of his body in a lewd manner or commits any other lewd act (a) in a public place, or (b) in private premises under circumstances in which he may readily be observed from either a public place or from other private premises, and with intent that he be so observed.” Quoted 2 times
 (c) Public lewdness. Section 245.00 of the New York Penal Code is hereby adopted and incorporated into the regulations of this part.
2
36 CFR 7.29

[41 FR 19220, May 11, 1976, as amended at 44 FR 44157, July 27, 1979; 52 FR 10686, Apr. 2, 1987]

Saturday, April 1, 2017

NJSA 2C:43-11. Program of intensive supervision, ISP eligibility

NJSA 2C:43-11. Program of intensive supervision, ISP eligibility
 2. a. No custodial sentence imposed pursuant to Chapters 43, 44 or 45 of Title 2C shall be changed to permit entry into any program of intensive supervision established pursuant to the Rules Governing the Courts of the State of New Jersey if the inmate:

 (1) Is serving a sentence for a conviction of any crime of the first degree; or

 (2) Is serving a sentence for a conviction of any offense in which the sentencing court found that there is a substantial likelihood that the defendant is involved in organized criminal activity pursuant to N.J.S. 2C:44-1a(5); or

 (3) Is serving any statutorily mandated parole ineligibility, or any parole ineligibility imposed by the court pursuant to subsection b. of N.J.S. 2C:43-6; or

 (4) Has previously completed a program of intensive supervision established pursuant to the Rules Governing the Courts of the State of New Jersey; or

 (5) Has previously been convicted of a crime of the first degree, or of any offense in any other jurisdiction which, if committed in New Jersey, would constitute a crime of the first degree and the inmate was released from incarceration on the first degree offense within five years of the commission of the offense for which the inmate is applying for intensive supervision.

    Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to preclude the program of intensive supervision from imposing more restrictive standards for admission.

 b. Unless the inmate is within nine months of parole eligibility and has served at least six months of the sentence, no custodial sentence of an inmate serving a sentence for conviction of any crime of the second degree shall be changed to permit entry into any program of intensive supervision established pursuant to the Rules Governing the Courts of the State of New Jersey, if, within 20 days of receipt of notice of the inmate's application, the county prosecutor or Attorney General objects in writing.

 c. If an inmate's application for a change of custodial sentence to permit entry into any program of intensive supervision established pursuant to the Rules Governing the Courts of the State of New Jersey is granted over the objection of the county prosecutor or the Attorney General, the order shall not become final for 20 days or until reconsideration by the Intensive Supervision Resentencing Panel in order to permit the county prosecutor or the Attorney General to appear personally or in writing, with notice to defense counsel, to request reconsideration of the application approval.

 d. A victim of the offense for which the inmate was sentenced shall have the right to make a written statement or to appear at a proceeding regarding the application for a change of custodial sentence imposed pursuant to Chapters 43, 44 or 45 of Title 2C for entry into any program of intensive supervision established pursuant to the Rules Governing the Courts of the State of New Jersey.

The Judiciary website advises to be considered for entry into ISP, an inmate must have been convicted of a non-violent offense and be sentenced to a state prison term. Those who have been convicted of a 1st degree crime, bribery, corrupt influence, murder, robbery, or any sexual offense are automatically denied from participating in ISP. Those who are not committed to a state prison, have pending charges, or have a mandatory parole ineligibility are also denied from participating in ISP.

Those applicants with an aggravated assault conviction are not automatically denied. Each case is closely reviewed by the Regional Office and/or the Screening Board to determine the eligibility of the applicant. Most second-degree offenses are eligible; however, the Prosecutor's Office is solicited for their opinion of the applicant. If the Prosecutor's Office objects to the applicant being released into ISP, a "window date" is set. A "window date" is a calculation in which the applicant must serve a minimum of six months and be within nine months of parole before they are released into ISP. Source http://www.judiciary.state.nj.us/probsup/process.html


After receiving an application, there are four steps that must be completed before the applicant can be released into ISP.
Step 1: The Application
The first step is completing an application consisting of personal and criminal history identification information. The application is kept simple so it can easily be understood by inmates with any educational level. At this stage, an inmate must identify a Community Sponsor and Network Team to act as his or her support system in the community.
(Note: An applicant must serve a minimum of 60 days incarceration, before being seen by the Resentencing Panel.)
Step 2: Assessment Interview and Report
Based on the potential living arrangement indicated on the application, the applicant is assigned to a region. Upon receipt of the application, the Regional Office will obtain a copy of the Judgment of Conviction and Pre Sentence Report. After a review, the Regional Office may send the application to the development stage or refer the case to the Screening Board for further review. (The Screening Board may deny the case at this stage or recommend the case proceed to the development stage.)
Once the case goes into the development stage, it is assigned to a regional investigator. The investigator interviews the applicant in prison or by video conferencing. During this interview, biographical data, information on the applicant's version of the current offense, his or her reasoning for wanting ISP, future plans/goals, and any potential problems is collected. The investigator also collects information on the applicant's planned living arrangements, community sponsors and /or network team members. All information gathered by the investigator is compiled into an Assessment Report.
Throughout the investigative process, input from the sentencing judge(s), prosecutor(s), victim(s), pre-sentencing report writer(s), previous probation/parole officer(s), and the Chief of Police of the applicant's potential town of residence are solicited. The Assessment Report and the responses received from those solicited are forwarded to the Screening Board.
  Step 3: The Screening Board
The Screening Board, which is composed of an administrator from the Department of Corrections, an administrator from ISP and one community member, reviews the Assessment Report and any input from those involved with the offense. If deemed eligible, the applicant is interviewed by the Screening Board. During this interview, the applicant's sincerity and motivation is assessed. The Screening Board can either deny the applicant at this stage or recommend the applicant goes before the Re-sentencing Panel.
Step 4: The Re-sentencing Panel

The Re-sentencing Panel, which consists of three judges, makes the final decision after taking everything into consideration. The applicant is either released for a 90-day trial period in the program or denied and sent back to prison. Source http://www.judiciary.state.nj.us/probsup/process.html

Friday, March 31, 2017

18A:6-7.2 Fingerprinting; reimbursement of unpaid volunteers.

18A:6-7.2 Fingerprinting; reimbursement of unpaid volunteers.
2.An applicant for employment or service in any of the positions covered by this act shall submit to the Commissioner of Education his or her name, address and fingerprints taken in accordance with procedures established by the commissioner. The Commissioner of Education is hereby authorized to exchange fingerprint data with and receive criminal history record information from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Division of State Police for use in making the determinations required by this act. No criminal history record check shall be performed pursuant to this act unless the applicant shall have furnished his or her written consent to such a check. The applicant shall bear the cost for the criminal history record check, including all costs for administering and processing the check.

If a facility, center, school, or school system under the supervision of the Department of Education or board of education requires a criminal history record check for an unpaid volunteer, the facility, center, school, or school system under the supervision of the Department of Education or school board shall reimburse the applicant for the cost of the check. A facility, center, school, or school system under the supervision of the Department of Education or board of education may reimburse an applicant serving in a paid position for the cost of the check.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Municipal Court RULES GOVERNING THE COURTS OF THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY Court RULE 7:7. PRETRIAL PROCEDURE

Municipal Court RULES GOVERNING THE COURTS OF THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY
Court RULE 7:7. PRETRIAL PROCEDURES
Rule 7:7-1. Pleadings; objections
Pleadings in municipal court actions shall consist only of the complaint. A defense or objection capable of determination without trial of the general issue shall be raised before trial by motion to dismiss or for other appropriate relief, except that a motion to dismiss based upon lack of jurisdiction or the unconstitutionality of a municipal ordinance may be made at any time.
Note: Source-R. (1969) 7:4-2(e), 3:10-1. Adopted October 6, 1997 to be effective February 1, 1998.
Rule 7:7-2. Motions
(a) How Made. Except as otherwise provided by R. 7:5-2 (motion to suppress), motions in the municipal court and answers to motions, if any, shall be made orally, unless the court directs that the motion and answer be in writing. Oral testimony or affidavits in support of or in opposition to the motion may be required by the court in its discretion.
(b) Hearings. A motion made before trial shall be determined before trial unless the court, in the interest of justice, directs that it be heard during or after trial.
(c) Effect of Determination of Motion. Except as otherwise provided by R. 7:6-2(c) (conditional pleas), if a motion is determined adversely to the defendant, the defendant shall be permitted to plead, if a plea has not already been entered. If a plea has been entered, the defendant may be permitted to stand trial as soon as the adverse determination on the motion is made. If an objection or defense specified in R. 7:7-1 is sustained and is not otherwise remediable, the court shall order the complaint dismissed. If the court dismisses the complaint and the defendant is held in custody on that complaint, the court shall order the defendant released.
(d) Relief Requested by Certain Incarcerated Persons. An incarcerated, unrepresented defendant who seeks relief from the municipal court either before or after the entry of a guilty plea or trial, on a matter within the court’s jurisdiction, must set forth the relief requested in writing on a form approved by the Administrative Director of the Courts and submit the form to the Municipal Court and send a copy to the Municipal Prosecutor. The court must respond to the request on the record within 45 days of receipt of the form. If the court does not respond to the request on the record within 45 days, the inmate may seek immediate relief from the vicinage Presiding Judge.
Note: Source-Paragraph (a): R. (1969) 7:4-2(e); paragraph (b): R. (1969) 7:4-2(e), 3:10-2(b); paragraph (c): R. (1969) 3:10-7. Adopted October 6, 1997 to be effective February 1, 1998; new paragraph (d) caption and text adopted July 27, 2015 to be effective September 1, 2015.
Rule 7:7-3. Notice of alibi; failure to furnish
(a) Alibi. A defendant who intends to rely on an alibi shall, within 10 days after a written demand by the prosecuting attorney, furnish the prosecuting attorney with a signed statement of alibi, specifying the specific place or places at which the defendant claims to have been at the time of the alleged offense and the names and addresses of the witnesses upon whom the defendant intends to rely to establish the alibi. Within 10 days after receipt of the statement of alibi, the prosecuting attorney shall, on written demand, furnish the defendant or defendant's attorney with the names and addresses of the witnesses upon whom the State intends to rely to establish defendant's presence at the scene of the alleged offense. The court may order any amendment to or amplification of the alibi statement as required in the interest of justice.
(b) Failure to Furnish. If the information required by paragraph (a) of this rule is not furnished, the court may refuse to permit the party in default to present witnesses at trial as to defendant's presence at or absence from the scene of the alleged offense or may make any other order or grant any adjournment or continuance as may be required in the interest of justice.
Note: Source-R. (1969) 3:12-2. Adopted October 6, 1997 to be effective February 1, 1998.
Rule 7:7-4. Notice of Defense of Insanity; Evidence of Mental Disease or Defect
(a) Insanity as a Defense. A defendant who intends to claim insanity as a defense, pursuant to N.J.S.A. 2C:4-1, or a lack of the requisite state of mind, pursuant to N.J.S.A. 2C:4-2, shall serve a written notice of that intention upon the prosecuting attorney prior to trial. For good cause shown, the court may extend the time for service of the notice or make such other order as the interest of justice requires. If the defendant fails to comply with this rule, the court may take such action as the interest of justice requires.
(b) Acquittal by Reason of Insanity. If a defendant interposes the defense of insanity and is acquitted after trial on that ground, the decision and judgment shall include a statement of those facts and the procedure for referral of the defendant as provided by N.J.S.A. 2C:4-8 and 2C:4-9 and R. 4:74-7 shall apply.
(c) Involuntary Civil Commitments. Rule 4:74-7 shall govern the practice and procedure in the municipal court for the disposition of involuntary civil commitment matters, pursuant to N.J.S.A. 30:4-27.1 et seq.
Note: Source-Paragraph (a): R. (1969) 3:12-1; paragraph (b): R. (1969) 3:19-2; paragraph (c): new. Adopted October 6, 1997 effective February 1, 1998; paragraph (b) amended July 5, 2000 to be effective September 5, 2000.
Rule 7:7-5. Pretrial Procedure
(a) Pretrial Conference. At any time after the filing of the complaint, the court may order one or more conferences with the parties to consider the results of negotiations between them relating to a proposed plea, discovery, or to other matters that will promote a fair and expeditious disposition or trial. With the consent of the parties or counsel for the parties, the court may permit any pretrial conference to be conducted by means of telephone or video link.
(b) Pretrial Hearings. The court may conduct hearings to resolve issues relating to the admissibility of statements by defendant, pretrial identifications of defendant, and sound recordings at any time prior to trial. Upon a showing of good cause, hearings as to the admissibility of other evidence may also be conducted at any time prior to trial.
Note: Source-Paragraph (a): new; paragraph (b): R. (1969) 7:4-2(d), 3:9-1(d). Adopted October 6, 1997 to be effective February 1, 1998; paragraph (a) amended July 16, 2009 to be effective September 1, 2009; paragraph (a) amended December 4, 2012 to be effective January 1, 2013.
Rule 7:7-6. Depositions
(a) When Authorized. If it appears to the judge of the court in which a complaint is pending that a witness is likely to be unable to testify at trial because of impending death or physical or mental incapacity, the court, upon motion and notice to the parties, and after a showing that such action is necessary to prevent manifest injustice, may order that a deposition of the testimony of that witness be taken and that any designated books, papers, documents or tangible objects that are not privileged, including, but not limited to, writings, drawings, graphs, charts, photographs, sound recordings, images, electronically stored information, and any other data or data compilations stored in any medium from which information can be obtained and translated, if necessary, into reasonably usable form, be produced at the same time and place.
(b) Procedure. The deposition shall be videotaped, unless the court otherwise orders. The deposition shall be taken before the judge at a location convenient to all parties. If the judge is unable to preside because the deposition is to be taken outside of the State, the deposition shall be taken before a person designated by the judge. All parties and counsel shall have a right to be present at the deposition. Examination, cross-examination, and determination of admissibility of evidence shall proceed in the same manner as at trial. Videotaping shall be done by a person chosen by the judge who is independent of both prosecution and defense.
(c) Use. Depositions taken pursuant to paragraph (a) of this rule may be used at trial instead of the testimony of the witness if the witness is unable to testify in court because of impending death or physical or mental incapacity, or if the judge finds that the party offering the deposition has been unable to procure the attendance of the witness by subpoena or otherwise, the deposition shall be admissible pursuant to the Rules of
Evidence applied as though the witness were then present and testifying. The deposition shall not be admissible, however, unless the court finds that the circumstances surrounding its taking allowed adequate preparation and cross-examination by all parties. A record of the videotaped testimony, which shall be part of the official record of the court proceedings, shall be made in the same manner as if the witness were present and testifying. On conclusion of the trial, the videotape shall be retained by the court.
Note: Source-R. (1969) 7:4-2(h), 3:13-2(a),(b),(c). Adopted October 6, 1997 to be effective February 1, 1998; paragraph (a) amended December 4, 2012 to be effective January 1, 2013.
Rule 7:7-7. Discovery and Inspection
(a) Scope. If the government is represented by the municipal prosecutor or a private prosecutor in a cross complaint case, discovery shall be available to the parties only as provided by this rule, unless the court otherwise orders. All discovery requests by defendant shall be served on the municipal prosecutor, who shall be responsible for making government discovery available to the defendant. If the matter is, however, not being prosecuted by the municipal prosecutor, the municipal prosecutor shall transmit defendant's discovery requests to the private prosecutor in a cross complaint case, pursuant to R. 7:8-7(b).
(b) Discovery by Defendant. Unless the defendant agrees to more limited discovery, in all cases, the defendant, on written notice to the municipal prosecutor or private prosecutor in a cross complaint case, shall be provided with copies of all relevant material, including, but not limited to, the following:
(1) books, tangible objects, papers or documents obtained from or belonging to the defendant, including, but not limited to, writings, drawings, graphs, charts, photographs, video and sound recordings, images, electronically stored information, and any other data or data compilations stored in any medium from which information can be obtained and translated, if necessary, into reasonably usable form;
(2) records of statements or confessions, signed or unsigned, by the defendant or copies thereof, and a summary of any admissions or declarations against penal interest made by the defendant that are known to the prosecution but not recorded;
(3) grand jury proceedings recorded pursuant to R. 3:6-6;
(4) results or reports of physical or mental examinations and of scientific tests or experiments made in connection with the matter or copies of these results or reports, that are within the possession, custody or control of the prosecuting attorney;
(5) reports or records of defendant's prior convictions;
(6) books, originals or copies of papers and documents, or tangible objects, buildings or places that are within the possession, custody or control of the government,
including, but not limited to, writings, drawings, graphs, charts, photographs, video and sound recordings, images, electronically stored information, and any other data or data compilations stored in any medium from which information can be obtained and translated, if necessary, into reasonably usable form;
(7) names, addresses, and birthdates of any persons whom the prosecuting attorney knows to have relevant evidence or information, including a designation by the prosecuting attorney as to which of those persons the prosecuting attorney may call as witnesses;
(8) record of statements, signed or unsigned, by the persons described by subsection (7) of this rule or by co-defendants within the possession, custody or control of the prosecuting attorney, and any relevant record of prior conviction of those persons;
(9) police reports that are within the possession, custody or control of the prosecuting attorney;
(10) warrants, that have been completely executed, and any papers accompanying them, as described by R. 7:5-1(a).
(11) the names and addresses of each person whom the prosecuting attorney expects to call to trial as an expert witness, the expert's qualifications, the subject matter on which the expert is expected to testify, a copy of the report, if any, of the expert witness, or if no report was prepared, a statement of the facts and opinions to which the expert is expected to testify and a summary of the grounds for each opinion. If this information is requested and not furnished, the expert witness may, upon application by the defendant, be barred from testifying at trial.
(c) Discovery by the State. In all cases, the municipal prosecutor or the private prosecutor in a cross complaint case, on written notice to the defendant, shall be provided with copies of all relevant material, including, but not limited to, the following:
(1) results or reports of physical or mental examinations and of scientific tests or experiments made in connection with the matter or copies of these results or reports within the possession, custody or control of the defendant or defense counsel;
(2) any relevant books, originals or copies of papers and other documents or tangible objects, buildings or places within the possession, custody or control of the defendant or defense counsel, including, but not limited to, writings, drawings, graphs, charts, photographs, video and sound recordings, images, electronically stored information, and any other data or data compilations stored in any medium from which information can be obtained and translated, if necessary, into reasonably usable form;
(3) the names, addresses, and birthdates of those persons known to defendant who may be called as witnesses at trial and their written statements, if any, including memoranda reporting or summarizing their oral statements;
(4) written statements, if any, including any memoranda reporting or summarizing the oral statements, made by any witnesses whom the government may call as a witness at trial; and
(5) the names and addresses of each person whom the defense expects to call to trial as an expert witness, the expert's qualifications, the subject matter on which the expert is expected to testify, and a copy of the report, if any, of such expert witness, or if no report is prepared, a statement of the facts and opinions to which the expert is expected to testify and a summary of the grounds for each opinion. If this information is requested and not furnished, the expert may, upon application by the prosecuting attorney, be barred from testifying at trial.
(d) Documents Not Subject to Discovery. This rule does not require discovery of a party's work product, consisting of internal reports, memoranda or documents made by that party or by that party's attorney or agents, in connection with the investigation, prosecution or defense of the matter. Nor does it require discovery by the government of records or statements, signed or unsigned, by defendant made to defendant's attorney or agents.
(e) Reasonableness of Cost. Upon motion of any party, the court may consider the reasonableness of the cost of discovery ordered by the court to be disseminated to the parties. If the court finds that the cost charged for discovery is unreasonable, the court may order the cost reduced or make such other order as is appropriate.
(f) Protective Orders.
(1) Grounds. Upon motion and for good cause shown, the court may at any time order that the discovery sought pursuant to this rule be denied, restricted, or deferred or make such other order as is appropriate. In determining the motion, the court may consider the following: protection of witnesses and others from physical harm, threats of harm, bribes, economic reprisals and other intimidation; maintenance of such secrecy regarding informants as is required for effective investigation of criminal activity; confidential information recognized by law, including protection of confidential relationships and privileges recognized by law; and any other relevant considerations.
(2) Procedures. The court may permit the showing of good cause to be made, in whole or in part, in the form of a written statement to be inspected by the court alone. If the court enters a protective order, the entire text of the statement shall be sealed and preserved in the court's records, to be made available only to the appellate court in the event of an appeal.
(g) Time and Procedure. A defense request for discovery shall be made contemporaneously with the entry of appearance by the defendant's attorney, who shall submit a copy of the appearance and demand for discovery directly to the municipal prosecutor. If the defendant is not represented, any requests for discovery shall be made in writing and submitted by the defendant directly to the municipal prosecutor. The municipal prosecutor shall respond to the discovery request in accordance with paragraph
(b) of this rule within 10 days after receiving the request. Unless otherwise ordered by the judge, the defendant shall provide the prosecutor with discovery, as provided by paragraph (c) of this rule, within 20 days of the prosecuting attorney's compliance with the defendant's discovery request. If any discoverable materials known to a party have not been supplied, the party obligated with providing that discovery shall also provide the opposing party with a listing of the materials that are missing and explain why they have not been supplied. Unless otherwise ordered by the judge, the parties may provide discovery pursuant to paragraphs (a), (b), (c), and (h) of this rule through the use of CD, DVD, e-mail, internet or other electronic means. Documents provided through electronic means shall be in PDF format. All other discovery shall be provided in an open, publicly available (non-proprietary) format that is compatible with any standard operating computer. If discovery is not provided in a PDF or open, publicly available format, the transmitting party shall include a self-extracting computer program that will enable the recipient to access and view the files that have been provided. Upon motion of the recipient, and for good cause shown, the court shall order that discovery be provided in the format in which the transmitting party originally received it. In all cases in which an Alcotest device is used, any Alcotest data shall, upon request, be provided for any Alcotest 7110 relevant to a particular defendant's case in a readable digital database format generally available to consumers in the open market. In all cases in which discovery is provided through electronic means, the transmitting party shall also include a list of the materials that were provided and, in the case of multiple disks, the specific disk on which they can be located.
(h) Motions for Discovery. No motion for discovery shall be made unless the prosecutor and defendant have conferred and attempted to reach agreement on any discovery issues, including any issues pertaining to discovery provided through the use of CD, DVD, e-mail, internet or other electronic means.
(i) Discovery Fees.
(1) Standard Fees. The municipal prosecutor, or a private prosecutor in a cross-complaint case, may charge a fee for a copy or copies of discovery. The fee assessed for discovery embodied in the form of printed matter shall be $ 0.05 per letter size page or smaller, and $ 0.07 per legal size page or larger. From time to time, as necessary, these rates may be revised pursuant to a schedule promulgated by the Administrative Director of the Courts. If the prosecutor can demonstrate that the actual costs for copying discovery exceed the foregoing rates, the prosecutor shall be permitted to charge a reasonable amount equal to the actual costs of copying. The actual copying costs shall be the costs of materials and supplies used to copy the discovery, but shall not include the costs of labor or other overhead expenses associated with making the copies, except as provided for in paragraph (i)(2) of this rule. Electronic records and non-printed materials shall be provided free of charge, but the prosecutor may charge for the actual costs of any needed supplies such as computer discs.
(2) Special Service Charge for Printed Copies. Whenever the nature, format, manner of collation, or volume of discovery embodied in the form of printed matter to be copied is such that the discovery cannot be reproduced by ordinary document
copying equipment in ordinary business size, or is such that it would involve an extraordinary expenditure of time and effort to copy, the prosecutor may charge, in addition to the actual copying costs, a special service charge that shall be reasonable and shall be based upon the actual direct costs of providing the copy or copies. Pursuant to R. 7:7-1, the defendant shall have the opportunity to review and object to the charge prior to it being incurred.
(3) Special Service Charge for Electronic Records. If the defendant requests an electronic record: (1) in a medium or format not routinely used by the prosecutor; (2) not routinely developed or maintained by the prosecutor; or (3) requiring a substantial amount of manipulation or programming of information technology, the prosecutor may charge, in addition to the actual cost of duplication, a special charge that shall be reasonable and shall be based on (1) the cost for any extensive use of information technology, or (2) the labor cost of personnel providing the service that is actually incurred by the prosecutor or attributable to the prosecutor for the programming, clerical, and supervisory assistance required, or (3) both. Pursuant to R. 7:7-1, the defendant shall have the opportunity to review and object to the charge prior to it being incurred.
(j) Continuing Duty to Disclose; Failure to Comply. There shall be a continuing duty to provide discovery pursuant to this rule. If at any time during the course of the proceedings it is brought to the attention of the court that a party has failed to comply with this rule or with an order issued pursuant to this rule, the court may order that party to provide the discovery of materials not previously disclosed, grant a continuance, prohibit the party from introducing in evidence the material not disclosed or enter such other order as it deems appropriate.
Note: Source - Paragraph (a): new; paragraph (b): R. (1969) 7:4-2(h), 3:13-3(c); paragraph (c): R. (1969) 7:4-2(h), 3:13-3(d); paragraph (d): R. (1969) 7:4-2(h), 3:13-3(e); paragraph (e): R. (1969) 7:4-2(h), 3:13-3(f); paragraph (f) new; paragraph (g): R. (1969) 7:4-2(h), 3:13-3(g). Adopted October 6, 1997 effective February 1, 1998; paragraph (c) amended July 5, 2000 to be effective September 5, 2000; paragraph (f) amended July 16, 2009 to be effective September 1, 2009; paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) amended, new paragraph (e) caption and text adopted, former paragraphs (e), (f), and (g) redesignated as paragraphs (f), (g), and (h) July 21, 2011 to be effective September 1, 2011; paragraphs (b), (c), (f), and (g) amended, new paragraphs (h) and (i) adopted, paragraph (h) redesignated as paragraph (j) and amended December 4, 2012 to be effective January 1, 2013; subparagraphs (b)(7), (c)(3), and (f)(1) amended July 9, 2013 to be effective September 1, 2013.
Rule 7:7-8. Subpoenas
(a) Issuance. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d), upon the issuance of process on a complaint within the trial jurisdiction of the municipal court, a subpoena may be issued by a judicial officer, by an attorney in the name of the court administrator, or, in cases involving a non-indictable offense, by a law enforcement officer or other authorized person. The subpoena shall be in the form approved by the Administrative Director of the Courts. In cases involving non-indictable offenses, the law enforcement officer may issue subpoenas to testify in the form prescribed by the Administrative Director of the Courts.
Courts having jurisdiction over such offenses, the Division of State Police, the Motor Vehicle Commission, and any other agency so authorized by the Administrative Director of the Courts may supply subpoena forms to law enforcement officers.
(b) Subpoena to Testify. A subpoena to testify shall state the name of the municipal court and the title of the action. It shall contain the appropriate case docket number and shall command each natural person or authorized agent of an entity to whom it is directed to attend and give testimony at a specific time and date when the court will be in session. The subpoena may also specify that the specific time and date to attend court will be established at a later time by the court. If the witness is to testify in an action for the State or for an indigent defendant, the subpoena shall so note and shall contain an order to appear without the prepayment of any witness fee as otherwise required under N.J.S.A. 22A:1-4.
(c) Subpoena to Produce Documents or Electronically Stored Information. A subpoena may require the production of books, papers, documents, electronically stored information or other items on the date of the scheduled court appearance. The court may enter a supplemental order directing that the items designated in the subpoena be produced in court at a time prior to the scheduled court appearance or at another location. The order of the court may also specify that the designated items may, upon their production, be inspected by the parties and their attorneys.
(d) Investigative Subpoenas in Operating While Under the Influence Cases. When the State demonstrates to the court through sworn testimony and/or supporting documentation that there is a reasonable basis to believe that a person has operated a motor vehicle in violation of N.J.S.A. 39:4-50 or N.J.S.A. 39:3-10.13, a vessel in violation of N.J.S.A. 12:7-46, or an aircraft in violation of N.J.S.A. 6:1-18, a municipal court judge with jurisdiction over the municipality where the alleged offense occurred may issue an investigative subpoena directing an authorized agent of a medical facility located in New Jersey to produce medical records related to the presence of alcohol, narcotics, hallucinogens, habit-producing drugs or chemical inhalants in the operator's body. If no case is pending, the subpoena may be captioned "In the Matter" under investigation.
(e) Personal Service. A subpoena may be served at any place within the State of New Jersey by any person 18 or more years of age. Service of a subpoena shall be made by personally delivering a copy to the person named, together with the fee allowed by law, except that if the person is a witness in an action for the State or an indigent defendant, the fee shall be paid before leaving the court at the conclusion of the trial by the municipal court administrator as otherwise required by N.J.S.A. 22A:1-4. After service of a subpoena, the person serving the subpoena shall promptly file a copy of the subpoena and proof of service with the court.
(f) Continuing Duty to Appear. A witness who has been personally served with a subpoena shall remain under a continuing obligation to appear until released by the court.
(g) Failure to Appear. In the absence of an adequate excuse, any person who fails to obey a personally served subpoena, as evidenced by an executed return of service, is
subject to punishment for contempt of court. The court may issue a warrant for the arrest of the person subject to contempt as authorized by N.J.S.A. 2A:10-8.
(h) Motion to Quash. The court, on motion made prior to the scheduled court date, may quash or modify a subpoena to testify or a subpoena to produce writings or electronically stored information if compliance would be unreasonable, oppressive or not in compliance with the procedures required under this rule.
Note: Source-R. (1969) 7:3-3. Adopted October 6, 1997 to be effective February 1, 1998; caption amended, former text deleted, captions and text for new paragraphs (a) through (h) adopted July 16, 2009 to be effective September 1, 2009.
Rule 7:7-9. Filing appearance
The attorney for the defendant in an action before the municipal court shall immediately file an appearance with the municipal court administrator of the court having jurisdiction over the matter and shall serve a copy on the appropriate prosecuting attorney or other involved party, as identified by the municipal court administrator.
Note: Source-R. (1969) 3:8-1. Adopted October 6, 1997 to be effective February 1, 1998.
Rule 7:7-10. Joint representation
No attorney or law firm shall enter an appearance for or represent more than one defendant in a multi-defendant trial or enter a plea for any defendant without first securing the court's permission by motion made in the presence of the defendants who seek joint representation. The motion shall be made as early as practicable in the proceedings in order to avoid delay of the trial. For good cause shown, the court may allow the motion to be brought at any time.
Note: Source-R. (1969) 3:8-2. Adopted October 6, 1997 to be effective February 1, 1998.
Rule 7:7-11. Use of Acting Judges Pursuant to Standing Assignment Judge Order
(a) As to any pretrial application made when court is not in session for the issuance of a telephonic arrest warrant, R. 7:2-1(e); for the issuance of a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO), R. 5:7A; for the issuance of a search warrant, R. 3:5-3(a) or R. 7:5-1(a); or for the setting of bail, R. 3:26-2(a) and R. 7:4-2(a), if no judge of that court is able to hear the application, an acting judge may be contacted pursuant to a standing order entered by the Assignment Judge that prescribes the sequence in which resort is made to any such acting judges.
(b) An acting judge handling an application pursuant to paragraph (a) of this rule should make a record of the reason the application is not being handled by the court to which the application was first submitted.

Note: Adopted July 21, 2011 to be effective September 1, 2011.